Newsletter - Screensign Arts

Screen Sign Arts in global soft drink fountain development

Screen Sign Arts/Airform International - Freestyle project.

The worlds largest soft drink company, The Coca-Cola Company, is testing a state-of-the art new fountain dispenser and Screen Sign Arts is supplying the innovative lighting.
The Coca-Cola Freestyle machine can pour more than 100 different branded beverages from a single dispenser. The Coca-Cola Company sells beverages in more than 200 countries at a rate of nearly 1.6 billion servings a day.
Screen Sign Arts, which regularly partners with two other Christchurch companies - Airform and Talbot Plastics - on leading edge-lit plastic assemblies, was contracted by Australia-based Invetech Pty Ltd for the illumination of the major graphic element on the front of the Coca-Cola Freestyle cabinet, being the familiar white Coca-Cola ribbon. It used a special technique it has developed known as photometric edge lighting, in which it has become very skilled, over years of involvement in the merchandising display lighting sector.

Screen Sign Arts Managing Director Richard Hunter says it provides highly efficient illumination with strong visual impact for point-of-sale devices, shelving and merchandising displays.
Hunter says the contract emphasises yet again the calibre of Christchurch companies involved in the technology sector:
We have been able to technically out perform the biggest lighting companies in the world with this application. We often hear the big names mentioned when it comes to technology in Christchurch but there are a lot of smaller companies like ours in this city that are able to get out there with projects and solutions that foot it with the best in the world.
The combined smarts of our photometric lighting engineers and our display technologists have provided us with the international edge in this project, but a large part of our success in this and other projects lies in being able to call in further areas of expertise that reside in other Christchurch companies.
With this excellent network behind us, we can confidently tackle large projects and deliver high-quality turnkey solutions.
LED lighting is regarded as the future of illumination as it produces a bright, white light more vibrant than is possible with any other technologies and more energy efficient. It generates less heat, and, importantly, does not contain mercury.
The Coca-Cola Freestyle project implementation contractor, Invetech Pty Ltd, is an Australian company that has been delivering product design and development, contract manufacturing and custom automation services to a range of global market sectors for 30 years.
Invetech won the project in March 2006. With operational facilities in the United States and Australia, it drew on design, engineering and manufacturing expertise stretching across medical, industrial and consumer industries.

For further information, contact:

Richard Hunter
Managing Director
Screen Sign Arts Ltd
Email: richard@screensign.co.nz
Mobile: 021 770 007



LED Lighting to replace Mecury filled tubes


Media Release
27 June 2008


LED Lighting Set to Replace Mercury-filled Tubes

A New Zealand-based developer of LED lighting applications is forecasting the end of the incandescent light bulb within just a few years, based on advances in manufacturing technology and the demand for zero mercury in lamps and lighting tubes.

ScreenSign Arts (www.screensignarts.co.nz) says even the compact fluorescent design, a popular energy saving device in recent years, is approaching the end of its design life.

The company believes the future of illumination is the Light Emitting Diode (LED), and it has invested accordingly in a number of novel applications using Photometric Edge Lighting. These are produced mainly for export as components for offshore manufacturers.

Managing Director Richard Hunter says concern about mercury levels is a major driver of demand for LED-based illumination for commercial use, including Point-of-Sale displays and merchandising. While the mercury content of fluorescent lamps has been reduced, these lamps still present a problem when it comes to collection and safe disposal at the end of their life cycle, Hunter says.

A fluorescent tube is a gas-discharge lamp that uses electricity to excite mercury vapor in argon or neon gas, resulting in a plasma that produces short-wave ultraviolet light. This light then causes the phosphor to fluoresce, producing visible light.

By contrast, an LED is basically a semi-conductor. When energy passes through two electron-charged materials, electrons jump from one material to the other. As an electron jumps, it emits energy in the form of a photon. The color of light created by a given LED depends on the amount of energy in that photon. This, in turn, depends on the material used for the layers. LEDs contain no mercury.

Health Risks from Exposure to Mercury

Mercury is a neurotoxin (toxic to the nervous system). The greatest risk is to the developing fetus, through exposure to methylmercury. Dietary methylmercury is almost completely absorbed into the blood and distributed to all tissues including the brain. The neurotoxic effects include subtle loss in motor skills and sensory ability at comparatively low doses, to tremors, inability to walk, convulsions and death at extremely high exposures. (Source: US EPA Mercury Study, Report to Congress, December 1997).

Mercury accumulates efficiently in the aquatic and marine environments. The main dietary pathway for mercury exposure is from eating fish, with bigger fish accumulating more mercury. In New Zealand, it is recommended that consumers eat a serving of the larger fish species (including marlin, shark, broadbill and sword fish) no more than once a fortnight. (Source: Food Standards Australia New Zealand March 2004).

Industrial demand for mercury in the US declined by 75 per cent between 1988 and 1996. Most emissions occur when solid waste or fuel is burnt. In the United States, there are regulations governing the collection and reprocessing of fluorescent tubes. In New Zealand there are some recycling services available to businesses, but few options for households.

Richard Hunter says with mercury being so mobile in the environment, there is likely to be continuing pressure to eliminate this metal from the waste stream. Mercury can be emitted in one location as a solid, convert to a vapor, and be deposited in water or soil elsewhere. The message from regulators around the world is that manufacturers must look at the opportunities to deal with mercury during the product life-cycle, rather than just at the point of disposal.

LED lighting, in addition to being more energy efficient, provides a zero-mercury alternative in an extremely wide range of manufacturing and commercial applications.

About Photometric Edge Lighting
It provides highly efficient illumination with strong visual impact for point-of-sale devices, shelving and merchandising displays.

About ScreenSign Arts Ltd
ScreenSign Arts is the South Islands largest provider of screen printing services. Established in 1972, the company has remained at the forefront of the industry through continuous development of new products and the application of technologies for innovative printing, signwriting and visual presentations. (www.screensignarts.co.nz)

Ends

Further information: Richard Hunter
Managing Director
ScreenSign Arts Ltd
Phone 0064 3 389 3035
Mobile 021 770 007



Bright Future Forecast for Innovative LED Edge Lighting

Photometric lighting specialist ScreenSign Arts Ltd is positioned for a major increase in export production, following the success of its illuminated graphics for beverage dispensers in the United Kingdom and Europe.

Managing Director Richard Hunter says at year-end 2007 ScreenSign Arts had produced the lighting components for more than 30,000 beer dispensers for the European market, achieving huge increases in operational efficiency and eliminating heat from within the dispensing systems.

Hunter says the success of the company's Photometric Edge Lighting Technology, using LED components, suggests it should be possible for the beverage dispensing industry to phase out light bulbs, including mercury-lined fluorescent tubes, sooner rather than later.

Christchurch-based ScreenSign Arts began commercialisation of Electroluminescent technology in 1998. The company has since negotiated a six-year agreement for distribution of its LED Photometric technology into the beverage sector in North America and Europe.

Hunter says LED-based photometric technology has the potential to significantly improve energy efficiency, and to help companies to meet new targets for greenhouse gas emissions.

"Our customers are using low-profile, high-output LED lighting to reduce their energy consumption for lighting by up to 64 per cent, with additional savings gained through a reduction in energy required for chilling their product and the dispensing lines."

LED Edge Lighting systems can provide around 45,000 hours of constant light - around four times the life of fluorescent light - and at only 6mm thick are compact enough to fit into small enclosed spaces.

Energy watchdog groups have welcomed the development in LED technology as a breakthrough in the way lighting is provided. "Lighting accounts for 20 per cent of all energy use in the US," says sustainability action group Earth Easy (www.eartheasy.org). "All this light, however, comes at a cost; producing the electricity creates pollution from power plants and greenhouse gas emissions."

LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) are basically a semi-conductor. When energy passes through two electron-charged materials, electrons jump from one material to the other. As an electron jumps, it emits energy in the form of a photon. The color of light created by a given LED depends on the amount of energy in that photon. This, in turn, depends on the material used for the layers. The cost of LEDS has declined significantly in recent years, opening up new opportunities to reduce maintenance costs and make significant energy savings.

ABOUT PHOTOMETRIC EDGE LIGHTING
It provides highly efficient illumination with strong visual impact for point-of-sale devices, shelving and merchandising displays.

ABOUT SCREENSIGN ARTS LLTD
ScreenSign Arts is the South Island's largest provider of screen printing services. Established in 1972, the company has remained at the forefront of the industry through continuous development of new products and the application of technologies for innovative printing, signwriting and visual presentations.
(www.screensignarts.co.nz)

ENDS
Further information: Richard Hunter, Managing Director, Phone 0064 3 389 3035




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